Spring Cleaning Tips For Your Small Apartment

So, you’re looking for some tips to help with cleaning and organizing your small apartment this Spring. Boy, have you arrived at the mecca of trustworthy advice coming from an internet source! Even though I write about mortgages and my topics typically have nothing to do with apartments and all to do with buying homes, rest easy knowing that this advice is going to be life-changing. So let’s get to the nitty-gritty!

Bedroom Spring Cleaning and Organizing Tips

Does your bedroom feel a bit too small for all of the things you currently own? Is your closet too small for the clothes you currently have? Are you having trouble getting your dresser drawers to close? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, our tips can help you with managing all of your clutter!

The best advice I could give you is just throw a lot of your things out. You’re not even really wearing half of the clothes you own anyway. I don’t care if any of your items hold some sentimental value, throw it out.

If you’re not interested in throwing things out, another option would be to move into a new home with a walk in closet!

Something like this one:

Spring Cleaning Closet

Not only does this walk-in closet (that I know your apartment does not have) offer the flexibility and the ability to organize all of your wardrobe, you most importantly do not need to throw anything away! Although, you should probably get rid of the pair of jeans that look like they’ve been thrown in the washer accompanied by a hacksaw and a toaster. This is very solid advice. Please do not wear those ever again.

Bathroom Cleaning and Organizing Tips!

When it comes to managing the tidiness of your bathroom, it’s very easy to add clutter over time here as well. You know what adds to the difficulty of keeping a tidy bathroom? Lack of space. Yes, that’s right. If you had a bigger bathroom, you could have more space to manage those items. You could probably have a second toilet paper holder and nobody would even judge you.

You know who has room for a second toilet paper holder? This person does.

Spring Cleaning Bathroom

 

Keeping your bathroom organized and tidy is easy when you have enough space to put things into cabinets. It’s also nice when there’s enough surface area on shelves to actually place your toiletries. Simply stated, it is much easier to stay uncluttered when you have the space to do so.

Last Tip: Still Feeling Confined By Clutter? Buy A House

If you actually thought you were going to get some good tips about how to fold your clothes properly, or the best way to create space where it doesn’t exist, you came to the wrong place. But what I will tell you, is that having a small apartment can make organized living impossible (unless you throw everything away). Especially when you’ve been in a small apartment for a few years, and the accumulation of personal items have made you rethink buying things you actually need.

An easy fix to staying tidy is to find a home that compliments your style and also gives you the space you want. Not only are you investing in a home that may eventually give you a return in investment through equity, you’re creating a place where you can feel good about staying in. A place you can fully expand and stretch your legs without worrying about the claustrophobic feeling of being trapped. A place you can call home.

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USDA Home Loans: Documents for Self-Employment

For this part of the series, we’re going to talk a bit about being self employed or an independent contractor and how this plays into the USDA mortgage process. Because the USDA Loan Program is a government program with income eligibility requirements, showing what you earn from your business is a large portion of the process. The underwriter assigned to your approval will want to see things like tax returns for the previous 2 years, 1099’s, invoices, bank statements, profit and loss statements, and balance sheets.

 

I Don’t Have Pay Stubs, How Do I Show My Income?

The underwriter requires a few documents to show your income if you do not have pay stubs, which you may not if you are self employed. Some borrowers may have a business bank account alongside their own, while others just have one bank account for their personal and business expenditures. Either option is fine, as long as your income can be documented and shown. The underwriter will be needing two years of your most recent tax returns. Your tax returns must have all pages and additional schedules attached in order to be accepted. The income reported under self-employment income and any additional income will be directly compared to the other documents that are to be sent in as well. If you have 1099 Independent Contractor income, the reported income on your tax return must match the sum of your 1099s. If they do not, the underwriter will be looking for a detailed letter of explanation and/or source for the disparity.

 

Profit & Loss: Financial Documents for Self Employed Borrowers

Profit and Loss Statements are financial statements that may also be called an income statement. Profit and Loss statements show the revenue, the cost, and the expenditures during a specific period of time for a business. A profit and loss statement is usually an annual statement, but it can also be semi-annual, or even quarterly statements. If you are self-employed, most, if not all, lenders will require the most recent annual statement. The underwriter looks at the profit and loss statement for a borrower to see the “economical feasibility” of a company. This basically means the underwriter will be looking at the information about a company’s ability to generate income, as well as giving him or her an idea of the expenditures of a company. As mentioned before, if a profit and loss statement for 2018 is asked for, that information needs to match the information on a Tax Return for that same year. This means that if you do not receive W-2 forms from an employer, you will need to have the profit and loss statement be checked to make sure that it matches the tax returns. With this information, the underwriter can see if any taxes are owed, check if he or she has the tax payment plan or confirmation from you, or ask you for that tax documentation.

 

Balance Sheets: The Differences from a Profit & Loss Statement

Balance Sheets are very similar to Profit and Loss statements but also has different information. Balance Sheets basically report a company’s assets and resources. For larger companies that have shareholders that invest in the equity of the company, this information would also be on the balance sheet. The Balance sheet is a current year-to-date summary or snapshot of a company’s current financial capabilities. This financial information is current, so there’s nothing to really compare this information to besides business or personal bank statements showing the flow of money. As mentioned before, if you have a specific bank statement for your business, this statement would need to be sent in. Any deposits that are from this account going into your personal bank account will only need to be documented with a detailed letter of explanation.

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USDA Home Loans: Appraisal Document Requirements

For the USDA Home Loan program, we’ve covered most of the income and asset documents that the average borrower will need for the mortgage-lending process. In this blog post, we’ll be talking a bit about the “dreadful” Appraisal to make things a bit more easy to understand.

 

What is an Appraisal?

An appraisal is a report that determines the value and condition of a home. An appraisal report is similar to a home inspection but not as thorough, and should not be used as a replacement for one. An appraisal report is not a guarantee that all defects in a home have been reported, whereas a true home inspection might find such defects.

An appraiser is assigned to a home to come take photos of all rooms, including basement, attic, and crawl spaces to confirm the home is in good condition. If the home needs any repairs or there are concerns noted from the appraiser, these repairs are going to need to be rectified before the home can be sold. The appraisal allows the underwriter to see the condition of the home as well, and due to certain conditions, may request additional documentation in order to sell the home.

 

Why Do I Need An Appraisal?

An appraisal is needed for almost all loan types, except for streamline refinance options. An appraisal is needed so the underwriter can ascertain the value and condition of the home and determine if any additional items will be needed to close the loan. This is often the first and only look the underwriter has of a property that the mortgage is for. If the home does not meet the standards set by the latest USDA HUD Handbook, then the issues identified by the appraiser and/or underwriter will need to be addressed before the home can be sold.

Additionally, the appraisal gives the home a dollar value. This value must match or exceed the total purchase price of the home, or the purchase price will need to be re-negotiated. If the seller is not willing to come down in price, there’s a very real chance that this mortgage transaction will not go through. Usually this happens if the appraisal of the home comes in very low, to a number that the seller disagrees with. If the seller does agree to lower the purchase price, a purchase contract revision will need to be drafted, signed, and dated by seller, buyer, and all agents to confirm the new details of the loan.

 

What Additional Items Will I Need?

In some situations, the Appraisal Report can lead into additional expenses that may be rolled into the mortgage for the home. For example, if you are looking to buy a home that is on private well water, the underwriter will require a water inspection to ensure that the water is safe to drink. There are rules for who may obtain the water sample collected for the water test as well. Most companies will send one of their own to procure a sample, which is acceptable. However, if the company does not have someone that will do it, the borrower, the seller, or agents are not allowed to collect the sample due to conflict of interest. The only action they can perform is the actual ordering of the water test, and nothing else. The sample must be collected by a third party who will not benefit or have an interest in the purchase of the home.

Other inspections that can result from an Appraisal Report can be roof inspections, septic inspections, mold inspections, and termite inspections. These inspections will need proof that the home does or does not need repairs and must also provide the copy of the invoice. If you, as the borrower, purchase these inspections, these may be rolled into the cost of the loan if the purchase contract indicates that this will be the arrangement. While this may cost money, it is definitely for a good reason and to give you a peace of mind.

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USDA Home Loans: Asset and Income Documentation

What You Will Need

So, you’ve decided to go through with a USDA Home Loan. You’ve found the home of your dreams, and it resides within the eligibility criteria set forth by the USDA. What should you expect to have to make this process as easy and seamless as possible? Are you worried about what documents you’ll need to submit or how many paystubs you’ll need? In this blog, we’ll give some tips to help you go through the mortgage process as effortlessly as possible. While the mortgage loan process may seem daunting at first glance, we promise that it’s not as intimidating as you might think when it comes to USDA Home Loan Documents!

 

Asset Documentation: Overview And Bank Statements

In order to submit your file to the underwriter, you will need to provide the following USDA Home Loan Asset Documents: Bank statements and 401K or IRA statements. For bank statements, the underwriter requires the most recent 2 months or 60 days of bank statements to get an idea of money-spending practices and to identify any additional sources of income. Specifically for USDA, if there are any large deposits or several deposits, these will need to be sourced and explained with a large deposit letter of explanation and a copy of the source of the deposits. An example of a source for a large deposit can be a check copy, an invoice for work done, or a pay stub from work. The large deposit letter of explanation will need to explain exactly where the deposit came from, the date it was deposited as well as a clear indication as to whether or not it’s a source of income or a one-time deposit. This letter will also need to be signed and dated in pen by you.

 

Asset Documentation: What if I have 401K and IRA Statements?

For 401K and IRA Statements, these are typically only needed to show total assets and the possibility of reserves. If you’re submitting these documents, the underwriter will also require you to provide all pages of your terms and conditions of withdrawal. This information is usually found in the Plan Summary sent to you by your 401K or IRA account provider and the underwriter will need all pages of this document. While 401K or IRA accounts are optional, most borrowers will provide these accounts to show they can withdraw money during hardships to have reserves or to show a down payment for the home.

 

Income Documentation: Pay Stubs, Invoices, W2s and 1099s!

The primary way of showing the source of income is through pay stubs, invoices, W-2 forms and 1099 forms. The underwriter requires at least 30 days of pay stubs for multiple reasons: to confirm income reported by the borrower as well as to confirm the deductions. If you provide pay stubs which shows a deduction for child support, for example, the underwriter will need you to provide full documentation to support this. This includes divorce decrees that outline the terms of child support. If you are receiving child support, the underwriter will need the above and a year’s proof that you’re receiving child support to count it as income. You can typically request your divorce decree from your attorney, and the proof of income can come from the specific website from the state that shows child support payments. While there are some other one-off situations, where sourcing may be impossible, these can usually be overlooked with a proper letter of explanation. An example of this can be deposits from tips from working in a restaurant-type setting. If you have your own business, the underwriter will cross-reference the following items to show income: your 2 most recent tax returns, profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and 1099s.

While it may seem like a lot to acquire these USDA Home Loan Income Documents, most of this information is easily obtained from your employer. We recommend being prepared to explain most deposits that are not shown as payroll, and any extenuating situations as soon as you can, as this will prevent many additional stipulations from the underwriter on a conditional approval!

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Why You Should Choose A USDA Renovation Loan

USDA Renovation Loans

If you’re thinking about purchasing a new home through the USDA Loan Program, you may have other options! While you can easily just buy a home that is not in need of any repairs, the USDA Renovation Loan Program allows you to add a few more possibilities for purchasing homes, as long as they are in an eligible rural location. Unlike other loan programs, the USDA Loan Program has an eligibility criteria for homes based on location. The USDA Loan Program, however, allows lower income borrowers the flexibility to add more possible homes to their shopping list, all while keeping them very affordable.

USDA Renovation Loan Advantages: The Loan is Government Guaranteed!

Purchasing a fixer upper home through the USDA Renovation Loan Program offers plenty of benefits. One of the main benefits is the fact that the USDA Renovation Loan Program will roll in the costs of repair in the home being purchased, and that these renovations must be made before the sale of the home is finalized at the closing table. Because the USDA Renovation Loan Program is a government backed loan, these homes must also pass sanitary and safety regulations set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture in the most recent HUD Handbook before the home can be sold. This guarantees that you will be receiving a home with all the required work done prior to purchase and will also have a fully renovated and safe place to start a new life with your family.

The USDA Renovation Loan Program Will Save You Money!

Another benefit to choosing the USDA Renovation Loan Program and purchasing a home that needs renovations is the fact that the costs of repair are rolled into the mortgage. While this initially sounds like it would cost more money, the initial purchase price of homes that need repair are usually much lower than turnkey homes on the market. This is because the owner is willing to sell the home “as is,” while not wishing to be responsible for any repairs that are needed. Luckily, the repairs can be remedied while the additional costs are being rolled into the mortgage, resulting in a cost-efficient way to upgrade either a kitchen, bathroom, or patio!

Put Money Into Your Pocket With Instant Equity!

Did you know that upgrading your kitchen, bathroom, or any other living space can increase the value of your home? By upgrading these features, you are instantly adding appreciation to your home before you even purchase it. This would be a very cost efficient way to get the most out of a possible cash-out refinance later on down the road, putting even more money back into your pocket upon completing an appraisal to determine your home’s new value. Alternatively, if you’re looking to eventually purchase a new house altogether, selling your previous home that now has additional features and upgrades will increase the selling price as well. Not only do you save money by choosing to purchase your home with a USDA Renovation loan, but you also make money in equity after the renovations are completed! And even more, you are paying yourself to upgrade your home while also giving it your own personal flair!

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Why a FHA 203K Renovation Loan May Be Right For You

Fixer Upper Mortgage: FHA 203K Loans

If you’re thinking about purchasing a new home through the FHA Loan Program, be sure to fully explore your options! While you can easily just buy a home that is not in need of any repairs, the FHA Renovation Loan Program allows you, as a borrower, to have a few more options for purchasing homes in any location. Unlike the USDA Loan Programs, which require the home to be in a rural location, the FHA Loan Program has no restriction on area. The FHA Loan Program allows borrowers the flexibility to add more possible homes to their shopping list, all while keeping them very affordable.

 

FHA 203K Advantages: Government Backed Loan

Purchasing a home that needs repair offers plenty of benefits. One of the main benefits is the fact that the FHA 203K Loan Program will roll in the costs of renovation in the home being purchased, and that these renovations must be made before the sale of the home is finalized at the closing table. Because the FHA 203K Loan Program is a government backed loan, these homes must also pass sanitary and safety regulations set by the Federal Housing Administration before they can be sold. This guarantees that you will be receiving a home with all the required work done prior to purchase and will have a fully renovated and safe place to start a new life of homeownership.

 

Renovating Is Very Cost Efficient!

Another benefit to choosing the FHA 203K Loan Program and purchasing a home that needs renovations is the fact that the costs of repair are rolled into the mortgage. While this initially sounds like it would cost more money, the initial purchase price of homes that need repair are usually much lower than turnkey homes on the market. This is because the owner is willing to sell the home “as is,” while not wishing to be responsible for any repairs that are needed. Luckily, the repairs can be taken care of while the additional costs are being rolled into the loan, benefiting you as the home buyer!

 

You Can Pay Your Future Self By Adding Your Personal Flair!

Another one of the biggest advantages is the fact you are adding value to your home before you even purchase it. By upgrading multiple areas like bathrooms, kitchens, decks or patios, you are adding those enhancements to your home. This would be a very strategic way to get the most out of a possible cash-out refinance later on down the road, putting even more money back into your pocket upon receiving a favorable appraisal to determine your home’s new value. Alternatively, if you’re looking to eventually purchase a new house altogether, selling your previous home that now has recent upgrades will increase the selling price as well. Not only do you save money by choosing to purchase your home with a FHA 203K loan, but you also make money in equity after the renovations are completed! And even more, you are paying yourself to upgrade your home to your liking!

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Why a Home Renovation Loan May Be Right For You

Featured

If you are looking for a home, a home renovation loan may be a better choice and also more cost-efficient than buying a home that is turnkey ready. A home renovation loan is a mortgage in which the cost of repairs are rolled into the loan itself. The most popular loan programs that have this ability are the FHA Loan Programs, also known as FHA 203k, The USDA Renovation Loan Program, and the VA Renovation Loan Program.

There are several reasons why this loan-type is advantageous. You have the ability to upgrade your home in a very cost-efficient way, you can add your own personal style with those renovations, and you can also add instant equity to the home before you even purchase! So not only do you pay less for a home that has the upgrades you may want, but you also pay yourself in equity by personalizing your home!

Homes That Need Renovations Are Cheaper

One of the biggest benefits is that homes that need renovations are usually priced lower on the market. If a home buyer is looking for a home that fits their budget but also wishes to save a bit of money getting the quality of home they want, this is one of the better options. For example, being able to renovate an outdated worn-down kitchen to an upgraded kitchen while rolling in the costs into the mortgage more often than not results in a purchase price lower than a home that has the upgraded kitchen already in the home.

You Can Add Personality To Your New Home

Another advantage to renovating a home and rolling the costs of it into your mortgage loan is the fact that you can add some personal flair to your home without necessarily having to rebuild the entire home. Finding a home that may need a few repairs allows the buyer to make the choice of how they would like those items repaired. A run-down kitchen with soapstone countertops not your thing? Roll in the costs of beautiful granite countertops to give your kitchen that modern look instead. Bring out your personality by renovating and upgrading the way you want!

Instant Equity: Money In Your Pocket Later On!

One of the biggest advantages is the fact you are adding value to your home before you even purchase it. By upgrading core areas like bathrooms, kitchens, decks or patios, you are adding those amenities to your home. This would be a very strategic way to get the most out of a possible cash-out refinance later on down the road, putting even more money back into your pocket upon receiving a favorable appraisal to determine your home’s new value. Alternatively, if you’re looking to upgrade into a new house altogether, selling your previous home that now has recent upgrades will increase the selling price as well. Not only do you save money making the purchase to begin with, but you also make money in equity after the renovations are complete!

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide: Tax Returns

Introduction to Tax Returns

For this blog update, we will be discussing the first time home buyer’s need to provide Tax Returns for the home loan. There are many different reasons why a first time home buyer will need to provide tax returns. These reasons can range from sourcing large deposits on a bank statement to comparing income from self-employment income.

 

Tax Returns will help an underwriter validate a first time home buyer’s income.

Reasons Why A Tax Return May Be Requested

One of the primary reasons why a Tax Return may be requested for a first time home buyer is to source a large deposit. In this case, the underwriter will need a large deposit letter of explanation verifying that the deposit was in fact from the tax return. If there are any differences in the tax return, this would need to be further clarified. For example, if a first time home buyer uses a tax preparation service that charges for preparing his or her taxes, then the tax return amount may differ from the amount being deposited. In this case, the submission of the tax return, as well as the invoice for the tax preparation service that shows what the first time home buyer should be receiving. It is safe to assume that the underwriter will never make assumptions about sourcing large deposits into a bank account. The more documentation and better explanation a first time home buyer provides, the less of a chance that the underwriter will question it and ultimately add it as a condition for a conditional approval. 

 

Another reason why a first time home buyer would need to provide tax returns for the loan process would be that the borrower has their own business, or is obtains a 1099. In these cases, the underwriter will need to verify the first time home buyer’s income and also make sure that the first time home buyer doesn’t owe taxes. If the first time home buyer owes taxes, the underwriter will also require proof that there is a payment plan in place, or that the taxes have been paid by the first time home buyer. When a first time home buyer also has Schedule C income, the underwriter will need to verify that this income matches the income that the borrower made that year. To do this, the first time home buyer will either need his or her 1099 forms, and/or profit and loss statements. The underwriter will compare these forms to see that they match. This is also something an underwriter will do if the borrower as W-2 Forms as well. This is usually how they’ll be able to tell if there is income missing, especially for the loan programs that require income to be under certain limits.

If an underwriter requires a tax return, the first time home buyer must send in all pages of the tax return, including all schedules.

What If The Underwriter Needs The Tax Returns?

If the underwriter has asked the first time home buyer for the last two years of tax returns, this is not a cause for concern. The first time home buyer will only need to provide all pages of the tax return, as well as any additional schedules that were also filed along with the return. On the second page of the actual tax return labeled “1040,” all filers on the tax return, including the spouse if it was filed jointly, will need to sign and date in pen in the “Sign Here” section located near the bottom. This is to confirm to the underwriter that this information has been verified and is accurate to the best of the borrower’s knowledge.

For the next blog update, we will be talking more about the purchase contract, which is the legal contract that is the essentially the foundation of any mortgage loan!

 

 

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide – Recommended Tips Before Applying A Loan: Part 4

For this last part of the series, we will be talking about additional requested documents that will be requested for submission. Depending on the loan program, the underwriter will need information to verify household income. Also, for first time home buyers whom own their own businesses, there will also need to be additional documentation needed to show the underwriter exactly how much income is being brought in by these businesses. We will be going over those documents.

All members in the household for USDA Loans must submit income documentation if they are over the age of 18

Additional Household Documentation

For the first time home buyer applying for a USDA home loan, the underwriter will need to know exactly how much income everyone in the household is making. This can be done in several ways. The underwriter will request tax returns, Employer W-2 Forms, pay stubs and verification of employment. These items all contain information about income, either immediate income or annual income. Pay stubs have year-to-date information, which can give the underwriter an idea as to how much the first time home buyer and household members earning an income have made throughout this year. This form is also cross-referenced with the verification of employment, which is filled out by the employer. As mentioned in a previous article of this series, the first time home buyer can save time with these loans by providing the most recent 30 days of pay stubs, as well as sending in pay stubs as they are made available while the loan process continues. The underwriter will be looking for any changes in income, whether it is a fluctuation in hours or additional deductions, among other criteria previously mentioned. The first time home buyer need to make sure they send in all pay stubs for all persons in the home that is receiving a pay check. If a spouse, or a household member over the age of 18 does not have any income, that member is responsible for sending what is called a No Income Letter, that is signed and dated in pen, letting the underwriter know. 

If the first time home buyer is self employed, additional documentation will be needed by the underwriter.

Self Employed First Time Home Buyer Documentation
For borrowers who own their own businesses, pay stubs may not be something that is acquired as well as business bank accounts. The underwriter requires the business accounts to help show the income of a first time home buyer who is self-employed. All pages of the tax returns must also reflect that the first time home buyer has Schedule C, or self-employed income. This is usually illustrated by a positive or a negative value, as well as additional pages on the tax return itself. The first time home buyer can make sure that they get all of their tax return documentation together, including all pages and schedules to save some time sourcing their self-employment income. Since the self-employed first time home buyer may not be receiving pay stubs, the underwriter will require both a Profit and Loss statement, as well as a Balance sheet. These items can be prepared beforehand, and submitted as soon as possible to get the ball rolling on these loans. 

With these added tips, we will be going into more detail on the Profit And Loss Statements, as well as Balance Sheets for the next blog update!

 

 

 

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide – Recommended Tips Before Applying A Loan: Part 2

For this second part of the blog, we will be talking about very commonly requested documents that can be gotten ahead of time. We’re hoping this blog post will speed up the process of the loan as well as to prepare first time home buyers for additional items that may be requested upon review of other documents. Some of these additional items the first time home buyer will need to request either from their employer or from other third parties.

Pay stubs are one of the few items that the underwriter may require to close a loan

Additional Income Documentation

As mentioned before, the first time home buyer may be required to attain some additional information from third parties. These can be pay stubs, W-2 forms, 1099 forms, award letters, and award continuance letters. As mentioned before, pay stubs are needed to source any large deposits on bank statements. However, the lender will still need the first time home buyer to send in the most recent thirty days of pay stubs. The underwriter will also be looking for additional information on those pay stubs. If there are any garnishments, for example, this will trigger the lender to ask for supporting documentation.

For example, if the garnishments mention tax or IRS, the lender will need the IRS documentation that illustrates the details of the tax lien in question. This letter will include how much is owed, the total balance, and how much each payment will be. Another garnishment example is child support. This takes a step into more legal documentation. The underwriter needs to know exactly where the first time home buyer’s income is coming from, and also exactly how much of that income needs to go to another third party. The underwriter will also need to know for how long this percentage of the first time home buyer’s income is garnished for as well, and will adjust the debt-to-income ratio accordingly. 

The underwriter will also need third party documents such as Social Security Administration Award letters, Social Security Disability Award letters, and Pension Letters to show that there is an income from a third party. These letters must be accompanied by, OR include the continuance of those benefits. The usual length of continuance that the underwriter is looking for is three years. The Social Security Administration award letters usually indicate that these benefits will continue for a lifetime

Garnishments on pay stubs will need to be sourced and explained.

Additional Legal Documentation That May Be Needed

There are several court-ordered documents that will need to be submitted with the first time home buyer’s file, if applicable. These documents are needed to properly source  any court-ordered agreements, child support and other possible sources of income or garnishment. For example, if a first time home buyer is receiving child support, the underwriter will need the following documentation: The full court-ordered Child Support Order, evidence of 12 months of child support payments, and proof that the child support will continue. The Child Support Order can be received from the attorney that helped with the filing. The attorney will also be in possession of the first time home buyer’s full divorce decree and separation agreement, if those items are also applicable.

 

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