First Time Home Buyer’s Guide: Tax Returns

Introduction to Tax Returns

For this blog update, we will be discussing the first time home buyer’s need to provide Tax Returns for the home loan. There are many different reasons why a first time home buyer will need to provide tax returns. These reasons can range from sourcing large deposits on a bank statement to comparing income from self-employment income.

 

Tax Returns will help an underwriter validate a first time home buyer’s income.

Reasons Why A Tax Return May Be Requested

One of the primary reasons why a Tax Return may be requested for a first time home buyer is to source a large deposit. In this case, the underwriter will need a large deposit letter of explanation verifying that the deposit was in fact from the tax return. If there are any differences in the tax return, this would need to be further clarified. For example, if a first time home buyer uses a tax preparation service that charges for preparing his or her taxes, then the tax return amount may differ from the amount being deposited. In this case, the submission of the tax return, as well as the invoice for the tax preparation service that shows what the first time home buyer should be receiving. It is safe to assume that the underwriter will never make assumptions about sourcing large deposits into a bank account. The more documentation and better explanation a first time home buyer provides, the less of a chance that the underwriter will question it and ultimately add it as a condition for a conditional approval. 

 

Another reason why a first time home buyer would need to provide tax returns for the loan process would be that the borrower has their own business, or is obtains a 1099. In these cases, the underwriter will need to verify the first time home buyer’s income and also make sure that the first time home buyer doesn’t owe taxes. If the first time home buyer owes taxes, the underwriter will also require proof that there is a payment plan in place, or that the taxes have been paid by the first time home buyer. When a first time home buyer also has Schedule C income, the underwriter will need to verify that this income matches the income that the borrower made that year. To do this, the first time home buyer will either need his or her 1099 forms, and/or profit and loss statements. The underwriter will compare these forms to see that they match. This is also something an underwriter will do if the borrower as W-2 Forms as well. This is usually how they’ll be able to tell if there is income missing, especially for the loan programs that require income to be under certain limits.

If an underwriter requires a tax return, the first time home buyer must send in all pages of the tax return, including all schedules.

What If The Underwriter Needs The Tax Returns?

If the underwriter has asked the first time home buyer for the last two years of tax returns, this is not a cause for concern. The first time home buyer will only need to provide all pages of the tax return, as well as any additional schedules that were also filed along with the return. On the second page of the actual tax return labeled “1040,” all filers on the tax return, including the spouse if it was filed jointly, will need to sign and date in pen in the “Sign Here” section located near the bottom. This is to confirm to the underwriter that this information has been verified and is accurate to the best of the borrower’s knowledge.

For the next blog update, we will be talking more about the purchase contract, which is the legal contract that is the essentially the foundation of any mortgage loan!

 

 

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide – Recommended Tips Before Applying A Loan: Part 4

For this last part of the series, we will be talking about additional requested documents that will be requested for submission. Depending on the loan program, the underwriter will need information to verify household income. Also, for first time home buyers whom own their own businesses, there will also need to be additional documentation needed to show the underwriter exactly how much income is being brought in by these businesses. We will be going over those documents.

All members in the household for USDA Loans must submit income documentation if they are over the age of 18

Additional Household Documentation

For the first time home buyer applying for a USDA home loan, the underwriter will need to know exactly how much income everyone in the household is making. This can be done in several ways. The underwriter will request tax returns, Employer W-2 Forms, pay stubs and verification of employment. These items all contain information about income, either immediate income or annual income. Pay stubs have year-to-date information, which can give the underwriter an idea as to how much the first time home buyer and household members earning an income have made throughout this year. This form is also cross-referenced with the verification of employment, which is filled out by the employer. As mentioned in a previous article of this series, the first time home buyer can save time with these loans by providing the most recent 30 days of pay stubs, as well as sending in pay stubs as they are made available while the loan process continues. The underwriter will be looking for any changes in income, whether it is a fluctuation in hours or additional deductions, among other criteria previously mentioned. The first time home buyer need to make sure they send in all pay stubs for all persons in the home that is receiving a pay check. If a spouse, or a household member over the age of 18 does not have any income, that member is responsible for sending what is called a No Income Letter, that is signed and dated in pen, letting the underwriter know. 

If the first time home buyer is self employed, additional documentation will be needed by the underwriter.

Self Employed First Time Home Buyer Documentation
For borrowers who own their own businesses, pay stubs may not be something that is acquired as well as business bank accounts. The underwriter requires the business accounts to help show the income of a first time home buyer who is self-employed. All pages of the tax returns must also reflect that the first time home buyer has Schedule C, or self-employed income. This is usually illustrated by a positive or a negative value, as well as additional pages on the tax return itself. The first time home buyer can make sure that they get all of their tax return documentation together, including all pages and schedules to save some time sourcing their self-employment income. Since the self-employed first time home buyer may not be receiving pay stubs, the underwriter will require both a Profit and Loss statement, as well as a Balance sheet. These items can be prepared beforehand, and submitted as soon as possible to get the ball rolling on these loans. 

With these added tips, we will be going into more detail on the Profit And Loss Statements, as well as Balance Sheets for the next blog update!

 

 

 

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide – Recommended Tips Before Applying A Loan: Part 2

For this second part of the blog, we will be talking about very commonly requested documents that can be gotten ahead of time. We’re hoping this blog post will speed up the process of the loan as well as to prepare first time home buyers for additional items that may be requested upon review of other documents. Some of these additional items the first time home buyer will need to request either from their employer or from other third parties.

Pay stubs are one of the few items that the underwriter may require to close a loan

Additional Income Documentation

As mentioned before, the first time home buyer may be required to attain some additional information from third parties. These can be pay stubs, W-2 forms, 1099 forms, award letters, and award continuance letters. As mentioned before, pay stubs are needed to source any large deposits on bank statements. However, the lender will still need the first time home buyer to send in the most recent thirty days of pay stubs. The underwriter will also be looking for additional information on those pay stubs. If there are any garnishments, for example, this will trigger the lender to ask for supporting documentation.

For example, if the garnishments mention tax or IRS, the lender will need the IRS documentation that illustrates the details of the tax lien in question. This letter will include how much is owed, the total balance, and how much each payment will be. Another garnishment example is child support. This takes a step into more legal documentation. The underwriter needs to know exactly where the first time home buyer’s income is coming from, and also exactly how much of that income needs to go to another third party. The underwriter will also need to know for how long this percentage of the first time home buyer’s income is garnished for as well, and will adjust the debt-to-income ratio accordingly. 

The underwriter will also need third party documents such as Social Security Administration Award letters, Social Security Disability Award letters, and Pension Letters to show that there is an income from a third party. These letters must be accompanied by, OR include the continuance of those benefits. The usual length of continuance that the underwriter is looking for is three years. The Social Security Administration award letters usually indicate that these benefits will continue for a lifetime

Garnishments on pay stubs will need to be sourced and explained.

Additional Legal Documentation That May Be Needed

There are several court-ordered documents that will need to be submitted with the first time home buyer’s file, if applicable. These documents are needed to properly source  any court-ordered agreements, child support and other possible sources of income or garnishment. For example, if a first time home buyer is receiving child support, the underwriter will need the following documentation: The full court-ordered Child Support Order, evidence of 12 months of child support payments, and proof that the child support will continue. The Child Support Order can be received from the attorney that helped with the filing. The attorney will also be in possession of the first time home buyer’s full divorce decree and separation agreement, if those items are also applicable.

 

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First Time Home Buyer’s Guide – Recommended Tips Before Applying A Loan: Part 1

For this blog update, we will be giving a few tips that will help prepare a first time home buyer for the mortgage lending process. These tips are to help a first time buyer prepare for a very smooth process, with as few delays and obstacles as possible. 

The first time home buyer should make sure that they take care of all adverse credit items they can before engaging in the loan process.

Taking Care of Your Credit

One of the most important things the first time home buyer can take care of is their credit. Having a credit score of 640 and higher is very important, but making sure the first time home buyer’s credit is as clean as possible is also important. The lender will be taking into account any late payments, collections, and other forms of adverse credit that will show up on the first time home buyer’s credit report. If the first time home buyer has a majority of on-time payments, the creditor, upon request, may delete a late payment. This isn’t guaranteed but sometimes they may honor the request depending on credit-worthiness and history with that borrower. Any forms of adverse credit that is found on the first time home buyer’s credit report will need to be explained in detail. A qualified letter will need to cover the following aspects: What happened, how it was out of the first time home buyer’s control, and what steps they’ve taken to prevent future occurrences. As with all letters of explanation, this will need to be signed in pen and dated.

 

All large deposits in bank statements will need to be sourced if they are not payroll.

Getting Asset Documentation Together: Bank Statements and Paychecks

One of the possible slow-downs for the first time home buyer’s loan process can be documenting assets and funds for closing. The lender will require the most recent two months of bank statements for submission. Depending on loan program, the first time home buyer may need to provide all of the bank statements of the household, or just the bank statements needed to show the funds required for closing. One of the easiest things the first time home buyer can do is switch over from receiving paychecks to direct deposit, as these deposits will not need to be sourced. Remember, depending on the loan program, large deposits that are not payroll will need to be sourced to ensure there isn’t another income-source for the first time home buyer, or that this money is not from money-laundering. If the first time home buyer decides to stay with pay checks, an easy way to source the large deposits on the bank statements would be to collect them and send them with the bank statements, along with a letter of explanation that explains to the underwriter the source of these deposits. This letter of explanation should have any discrepancies in the pay checks written out and include the check dates responsible for each deposit for clarity. For example, if the first time buyer deposits a check for $731.31, the deposit into the bank account shows as $700.31, the first time home buyer will need to address why there is a difference. 

 

For the next part of this blog, we will be discussing about other asset documentation such as 401k documentation and what is needed for submission for those items.

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: An Introduction to Homeowner’s Insurance: USDA Loans

This latest blog update will be about the Homeowner’s Insurance policies, Homeowner’s Insurance requirements for the USDA Loan programs, and additional policies like Flood Insurance that may be needed for the loan. For every loan program, a Homeowner’s Insurance policy may be mandatory for closing, especially if a home is being financed through a mortgage. However, a Homeowner’s Insurance policy does not always need to be active and is up to the sole discretion of the first time home owner after the first year of ownership. While this is not generally recommended, in case something happens that would otherwise be an extremely costly repair, it is not a law to have Homeowner’s Insurance.

Homeowner’s Insurance for USDA Loans are typically required.

Homeowner’s Insurance Requirements for the USDA Loan Program

The Homeowner’s Insurance requirements for the USDA program indicates that in order for the loan to be able to closed, the policy must have the following items:

  1. Dwelling Coverage to match the loan amount.
    1. If it’s lower than the loan amount, the Insurance Company must provide what is called a Replacement Cost Estimator, or RCE for short. This document breaks down how the Homeowner’s Insurance Company arrived at their dwelling coverage amount. This document along with the Homeowners Insurance should be enough to clear the condition, but it is also underwriter’s discretion.
  2. Named Insured and Mortgagee Clause to match loan documents
    1. The Homeowners Insurance policy must have the insured person(s) match the person(s) on the loan. 
    2. Additionally, the Mortgagee section should have the Mortgagee Clause of the Lender, including the loan number. All of these items should match the loan documents exactly.
  3. Acceptable Deductible
    1. The deductible for USDA homeowner’s insurance policies MUST be either 1% of the dwelling coverage OR a $1000 whichever is greater.
      1. For example, if a policy’s dwelling coverage amount is $160,000, the deductible is allow to exceed $1000, up to a maximum of $1600, but no greater.

An insurance binder, Evidence of Insurance, Memorandum of Insurance, or Certificate of Insurance are all acceptable documents up to closing. However, a Homeowner’s Declaration’s Page and Invoice must be provided at closing. This is because an Evidence of Insurance and other documents have premiums and coverage that can be changed. Due to USDA’s strict guidelines, if the premium increases past what has been previously accepted, this may render the first time home buyer ineligible for the loan due to debt-to-income ratios. For the USDA program, the first year of insurance is paid by the first time home buyer’s lender out of the escrow account. This is so it’s guaranteed by loan closing that at least the first year is covered. 

The deductibles for both Flood and Dwelling Policies must be either 1% of the Coverage, or $1000, whichever amount is greater.

When the Home is in a Flood Zone: USDA Loan Program

When the home is considered by FEMA to be in a Flood Zone, the Lender may require Flood Insurance. This is indicative early on in the process by the Appraisal Report, as well as a Flood Certificate. For USDA Loans, Flood Insurance has the same guidelines as regular Homeowner’s Insurance for Dwelling Coverage, including the restrictions on deductible amounts. The only difference is the underwriter requires the invoice to show as paid in full. 

For the next update, we will be discussing Homeowners Insurance policy for FHA and Conventional Loans, as the requirements are very much similar to each other. 

 

 

 

 

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: What You Can Expect: VA Loans Part 4

The Uniform Residential Loan Application

In the last section we briefly spoke about the Appraisal Report and additional documents that may be needed by the first time home buyer to receive a clear to close. This section will be about the documents needed for the general application for the VA Loan submission process. Just a note, that this section will be very similar to the USDA FHA, and Conventional Loan posts about this Uniform Residential Loan Application.

The general application for a loan is called the Uniform Residential Loan Application, or the 1003. First time home buyers will hear more mortgage-savvy individuals will refer to this as the “Ten-Oh-Three” form. This form is the form that the first time home buyer will submit along with all of their income, assets and legal documentation to a lender. This information needs to be filled out as completely as possibly by the first time home buyer. The first time home buyer will be assisted by the loan officer when filling this form out for their first home loan.

1003 Form: Honesty Is Your Best Policy

The first time home buyer’s responsibility is disclosing all of the information for the Loan Officer on this form, and being as accurate as possible. The purchase contract will be there to provide the information in regards to the loan type, amortization period, and the property information. The property information basically indicates what kind of property this will be, whether it’s a regular loan, new build, or refinance. Each section has specific information that will be need to be filled out together with the first time home buyer’s loan officer.

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Additional Sections on the 1003 Form

The next couple sections of the Uniform Residential Loan Application have to deal with borrower information. This information is absolutely crucial and will need to be as accurate as possible. This will be personal information such as date of birth, social security number, and current address. This will also include if there’s a co-borrower on the loan as well. The first time home buyer will also input their work information, including employer and work history. For VA Loan guidelines, the underwriter will need the last 2 years of employment, so if there are multiple employers this section has a place for this additional information. The underwriter will require a verification of employment from all of a first time home buyer’s  employers within the last two years of employment.

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The next section will be detailing assets and liabilities. This section will be asking about all of your bank accounts, IRAs and/or 401Ks or any other retirement accounts. The first time home buyer will also notice there’s a “liabilities” section. This section will also be requiring any current bills and monthly payments, such as a personal or car loan. These must all be documented so the loan officer and the underwriter can get an accurate representation of a first time borrower’s debt-to-income ratio, as well as assets that are available for the loan. For any legal related debts, such as child support or spousal support, there is also a section for this information to be added. The loan officer and underwriter will be looking for proof of all of these documents as well.

The other sections are for demographic information and disclosures and instructions about the document itself. The information added here should be as accurate as possible as well.

For the next section, we will be talking about the Conditional Approval and Closing.

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: What You Can Expect: Conventional Loans Part 2

In the last section, we discussed the importance and some documentation that would be needed with the submission of pay stubs and Bank Statements for a first time Conventional mortgage. In this section, we will go a bit more into some additional asset documentation as well as credit documentation that will need to be provided by borrower looking to purchase their first home.

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For acceptable asset documentation, the first time home buyer can bring in 401K, retirement and/or IRA funds for closing to show reserves. The underwriter for the lender will require the first time home buyer to provide the official most recent statement for these accounts, which shows any withdrawals and contributions as well as the vested balance. The other requirement for the first time borrower will be the terms and conditions. This document, which is usually labeled “Plan Summary” will outline all of the information in regards to taking a loan or withdrawing from the 401K account. Most first time borrowers may not even use the 401K to show funds for closing, but for reserves. In other words, the first time borrower just wants to show the underwriter that in case of hardship they will have a few months of reserves for paying the mortgage. By having these documents ready beforehand, the first time home buyer can send in a complete package with the assets mentioned in the previous update. Just as a reminder, the first time home buyer needs to provide the most recent official statement available, which may be quarterly or even annually. 

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As with other programs, the lender will wish to see the credit history and current credit score of the borrower looking to purchase their first home through the Conventional loan program. The credit of the first time home buyer is pulled for many reasons, such as seeing if there are any recent debts, any new credit lines, and inquiries from other mortgage companies for the first time borrower. For the Conventional loan program, as well as other loan programs, the credit score must be above a certain requirement and all debt-to-income must be documented. If a borrower has inquiries within the last 120 days, these inquiries must be explained and documentation is required if any of the inquiries resulted in a new credit account or line being opened.

 

The underwriter also wants to make sure that the first time borrower isn’t going through the mortgage lending process at the same time with another home. If the first time home buyer has to open a new line of a credit, it’s highly recommended to talk with the Loan Officer first. It is a possibility that opening a new line of credit, especially taking out a loan for personal purposes, can actually result in being denied for the home loan. More specifically, if the first time home buyer opens a new account that puts them over the debt-to-income ratio limit, they will no longer be eligible for that loan.  It’s very important that any actions from the first time home buyer that may affect debt to income and also the credit score be discussed with the Loan Officer working with them on their first loan first.

For the next section, we’ll talk a bit about the Appraisal Report required for the Conventional loan program. There will be some differences compared to the USDA and FHA programs, so we will also outline those as well.

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: What You Can Expect: Conventional Loans Part 1

For this part of the series, we will be discussing what a first time home buyer can expect with applying for a loan as Conventional. Buying a home through a Conventional loan program has several differences from the USDA loan program, but can closer related to the FHA program. The Conventional Loan program is the industry-normalized loan program that most home-owners participate in. This program doesn’t target any potential first time borrower over a repeat borrower, unlike the FHA Program.  If you’d like to learn more about the Conventional program in depth, including reasons why people generally pick this program over others, please check out the Conventional Loan Program update!

Image result for modern living roomSimilar to the USDA and FHA First Time Home Buyer Guide, we will be discussing Assets and Income first. The Conventional program is a bit more lenient in terms of requirements for asset documentation, such as bank statements. The first time home buyer can rest assured that household asset documentation is not required for this program. While large deposits do need to be sourced for this program, the large deposit “threshold” will be much more forgiving than the USDA program.

Non-payroll deposits of 1% or more of the purchase price will need to be sourced for Conventional programs. The underwriter needs to make sure that the first time home buyer’s money is coming from a credible, legal source, and will need to be documented. Non-purchasing spouse can submit their asset documentation only if they wish to. This includes others in the home that are over eighteen years of age. The only difference is if there are transfers going into the first time borrower’s account from another person’s bank account. If this is the case, that Bank Statement will need to be provided so the underwriter can source the transfers. Joint accounts will need to be submitted as long as the first time borrower is listed as an account holder as well. Other than that, submitting of Bank Statements is pretty straight forward.

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Just like for the USDA program, the underwriter will require 30 days of the most recent pay stubs for submission. As mentioned before, pay stubs are used for determining the baseline for income, and can also see if there any deductions for other things, such as child or spousal support. In order to get an accurate reading on debt-to-income, if there are any other additional deductions besides taxes, social security, etc., then there will need to documentation provided to the underwriter to show how long the additional deductions will be affecting the income. If the first time borrower pays or receives child support, a child support order is needed, and if a first time borrower pays or receives spousal support, a divorce decree and separation agreement will be required. Both of these items are required because the first time borrower will need to have debt-to-income recalculated if these items weren’t previously shown. 

For the next section, we will dive into a bit more for the Conventional loan program with Part Two of the series!

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: What You Can Expect: FHA Part 4

In the last section we briefly spoke about the Appraisal Report and additional documents that may be needed by the first time home buyer to receive a clear to close. This section will be about the documents needed for the general application for the FHA Loan submission process. Just a note, that this section will be very similar to the USDA post about this Uniform Residential Loan Application.

The general application for a loan is called the Uniform Residential Loan Application, or the 1003. First time home buyers will hear more mortgage-savvy individuals will refer to this as the “Ten-Oh-Three” form. This form is the form that the first time home buyer will submit along with all of their income, assets and legal documentation to a lender. This information needs to be filled out as completely as possibly by the first time home buyer. The first time home buyer will be assisted by the loan officer when filling this form out for their first home loan. The first time home buyer’s responsibility is disclosing all of the information for the Loan Officer on this form, and being as accurate as possible. The purchase contract will be there to provide the information in regards to the loan type, amortization period, and the property information. The property information basically indicates what kind of property this will be, whether it’s a regular loan, new build, or refinance. Each section has specific information that will be need to be filled out together with the first time home buyer’s loan officer.

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The next couple sections of the Uniform Residential Loan Application have to deal with borrower information. This information is absolutely crucial and will need to be as accurate as possible. This will be personal information such as date of birth, social security number, and current address. This will also include if there’s a co-borrower on the loan as well. The first time home buyer will also input their work information, including employer and work history. For FHA guidelines, the underwriter will need the last 2 years of employment, so if there are multiple employers this section has a place for this additional information. The underwriter will require a verification of employment from all of a first time home buyer’s  employers within the last two years of employment.

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The next section will be detailing assets and liabilities. This section will be asking about all of your bank accounts, IRAs and/or 401Ks or any other retirement accounts. The first time home buyer will also notice there’s a “liabilities” section. This section will also be requiring any current bills and monthly payments, such as a personal or car loan. These must all be documented so the loan officer and the underwriter can get an accurate representation of a first time borrower’s debt-to-income ratio, as well as assets that are available for the loan. For any legal related debts, such as child support or spousal support, there is also a section for this information to be added. The loan officer and underwriter will be looking for proof of all of these documents as well.

The other sections are for demographic information and disclosures and instructions about the document itself. The information added here should be as accurate as possible as well.

For the next section, we will be talking about the Conditional Approval and Closing.

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First Time Home Buyer Guide: What You Can Expect: USDA Loans Part 5

In the last blog post, we spoke about the Uniform Residential Loan Application, or the 1003 Form. In this final post, we will be talking about what happens after the initial submission for the first time home buyer.

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After the first time borrower,  along with the Loan Officer, submits the application with all of the required documentation to the lender, the underwriter will review all of the documents. Unless there is a statement of denial right then and there, the lender will reply with what is called a Conditional Approval. This approval outlines all additional documents required by the Loan Officer or Loan Processor, First time borrower, Seller’s and Buyer’s Agents, and Title companies associated with the transaction.

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Most documents required by the first time borrower at this stage may be any additional pay stubs and bank statements that have since expired. The first time borrower has to remember that pay-stubs expire after thirty days, and Bank Statements after forty five days. Also, if the first time borrower still does not have the needed funds for closing, the underwriter will ask for an updated Bank Statement to show those funds being available. Any funds added to a first time home buyer’s bank account that is not labeled on their statements as payroll will need to be sourced if this is the case. 

The title company will be responsible for sending in accurate title documents. These title documents include a Pre Closing Disclosure, Wiring Instruction, tax Certificate, Title Commitment, Errors and Omissions Insurance, Chain of Title and a Closing Protection Letter. The Pre Closing Disclosure outlines all of the costs of a loan is similar to a Master Statement that is received when a loan closes.  The Wiring Instructions are just instructions for sending money to the title company to pay for title documents. The Title Commitment includes the lender and first time purchaser, outlines any policies that are covered, like an owner’s policy and lender’s policy, and the coverages and exemptions that are covered under each. Additionally, the chain of title may be on the Title Commitment as well. The chain of title shows the the previous deeds transfers, up to a twenty four month period. The Title Commitment may also, in their title search, find judgments for either the seller and buyer. Sometimes, a title company will not go through with a loan until these judgments are addressed and satisfied. The Closing Protection Letter is a letter that forms an insurance contract between the title company and the lender. This contract will basically compensate the lender for any misconduct carried out by a closing agent, and will not hold the lender accountable for damages.

The seller’s and buyer’s agents will be responsible for any purchase contract extensions as well as any inconsistencies that may arise from the submitted purchase contract. For example, if there are any addendums, the underwriter will need these to be signed and dated by all parties to insure that the transaction is legally bound. 

The Loan Processor and first time home buyer will be responsible for procuring homeowner’s insurance for this first home. Buying a home for the first time can cause stress when it comes to searching for homeowner’s insurance, but a good Loan Officer will provide the first time home buyer with a specific number to keep the yearly premium under. The homeowner’s insurance has to be within the required debt-to-income ratio so that it will be affordable. 

Hopefully, this series of blog posts has helped a borrower with their first mortgage using the USDA Loan Program. Our aim was to hopefully prepare a first time buyer with their first home, and not be intimidated by the process. Next, we will be discussing the FHA program, and outline what the process would be for obtaining a first time home buyer’s first home. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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